The TMA covers the financial accounting concepts and practices in the businesses.

.jpg”>Arab Open University B291: TMA – 1st Semester 2013-2014 Cut-Off Date: 8th of December 2013About TMA: The TMA covers the financial accounting concepts and practices…

.jpg”>Arab Open University B291: TMA – 1st Semester 2013-2014 Cut-Off Date: 8th of December 2013About TMA: The TMA covers the financial accounting concepts and practices in […]
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Point out the implications of poor air quality on new construction for homes, businesses, and automobiles.

Point out the implications of poor air quality on new construction for homes, businesses, and automobiles. The post Point out the implications of poor air…

Point out the implications of poor air quality on new construction for homes, businesses, and automobiles.
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urpose of Assignment Corporate fraud has cost businesses and its shareholders mi

urpose of Assignment Corporate fraud has cost businesses and its shareholders millions of dollars and has been the source of legislation and regulations attempting to…

urpose of Assignment
Corporate fraud has cost businesses and its shareholders millions of dollars and has been the source of legislation and regulations attempting to provide oversight and guidance to corporate boards, executives, and practitioners. Think about how these laws have changed the practices of corporate executives and, in light of the Enron scandal et al., has it been enough?
Assignment Steps 
Resources: Legal Environment of Business: Online Commerce, Business Ethics, and Global Issues: Ch. 16 (pp. 364 -368), 22, and 23. 
Scenario: The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) has been in effect since 2002 and has cost businesses millions of dollars in personnel and administrative costs. Your company is in the process of “going public,” has underwritten its Initial Public Offering (IPO), and filed its registration statement with the Securities Exchange Commission. Your current executive team has asked you to create a plan ensuring SOX compliance is followed once you become a publicly traded company. 
Review the pertinent sections of The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) Act.  For purposes of this proposal to the board, only concern yourself with the compliance provisions of SOX (Sections 302, 401, 404, 409, and 802). 
Create a maximum 1,050-word proposal to the board outling the compliance project necessary to implement SOX. 
Cite a minimum of one reference for the five content areas taken from a business or legal resource. One resource must be from the University Library. 
Format your paper consistent with APA guidelines. 
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Corporate fraud has cost businesses and its shareholders mi appeared first on Essaybrook.

Diversification presents businesses with the opportunity to enter new markets, expand product or service lines

Diversification presents businesses with the opportunity to enter new markets, expand product or service lines, and, if done effectively, broaden the scope or reach of…

Diversification presents businesses with the opportunity to enter new markets, expand product or service lines, and, if done effectively, broaden the scope or reach of a […]
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Assignment 1: Training and Development in Small Businesses

Assignment 1: Training and Development in Small Businesses Due Week 4 and worth 240 points Select a small business with which you are familiar. Imagine…

Assignment 1: Training and Development in Small Businesses Due Week 4 and worth 240 points Select a small business with which you are familiar. Imagine that […]
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[ANSWERED] Blending the Personal and the Professional Many businesses are beginning to use

Blending the Personal and the Professional Many businesses are beginning to use social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace for professional purposes. It began…

Blending the Personal and the Professional Many businesses are beginning to use social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace for professional purposes. It began with coworkers sharing their accounts with each other socially, just as they did in college. The first interactions concerned activities such as photos of the company softball team or photos at a cocktail party at a recent sales meeting. However, as stated in the networking guide in Chapter 6, every business social function is a business function, so even sharing photos and pages with the work softball team began to blur the personal–professional boundary. The employees of Pearson, the drafter of this textbook, are no exception. When I began work on this chapter, I started a Facebook group called “Experiencing MIS.” I then queried Facebook for Pearson employees I guessed might have Facebook accounts and invited them to be “friends.” Most accepted, and I asked them to join the Experiencing MIS group. The first day I checked my account, I found an entry from Anne, one of my new friends, who stated that she had been out too late the prior night. That day she happened to be working on the sales plan for this book, and I realized that I didn’t want to know her current condition. So, in the group, I asked whether the blending of the personal and the professional is a good thing, and the following conversation resulted: Anne: I think that for a lot of reasons it is a good thing . . . within reason. I think that people seeing a personal side of you can humanize you. For example, my “I was out too late last night” post didn’t mean that I was not into work early and ready to go (which I was, just with a larger coffee than usual), just that I like to have a good time outside of my work life. Also, with all the time we spend at work, our social lives are intertwined with our work lives. Also, 9–5 work hours are becoming more and more obsolete. I may be updating my Facebook page at noon on a Friday, but you will surely find me working at least part of my day on Saturday and Sunday. Bob: I definitely see Anne’s point of view. There is the temptation to believe that we are all family. I am too old to believe that, but corporate advancement is always going to be predicated to some degree on your willingness to surrender the personal for the professional and/or allow blur. Technology may give you the illusion that you can safely have it both ways. I am skeptical of business applications for Facebook. My guess is most folks find them lame in the way that business blogs and Xmas cards from your insurance agent are Lisa: I actually think there is a place for Facebook in business . . . For example, think about how it’s connected a team like ours—where everyone is located all over the country—to have a place where we actually get to know each other a little better. It’s corny, perhaps, but reading people’s status updates on my iPhone gives me a better sense of who they are in “real life,” not just on the job. I’d get that if we all sat in the same office every day; given that we don’t, it’s a pretty decent substitute. I totally agree with Anne’s notion that, in many ways, the personal and the professional already do blur . . . but I think that’s more to do with who we are and what we do, than any specific notion of “corporations.” Our work is portable and always on—and judged by results, not hours logged (I think!). In a work universe like that, the lines sort of slowly and inevitably blur . . . PS: Anne, I was out too late too. Clearly, I am the curmudgeon here. But, just as I was reflecting on these comments, I received a private email from another person who chose not to be identified: Other person: A few weeks ago, Pearson started getting really into Facebook. I went from not really using it to getting tons of “friend requests” from coworkers. Then, I got a request from somebody in an executive position at Pearson. I was worried at first—I had heard so many stories of people who had lost their jobs due to social networking, blogging, or other information they posted on the Internet. When I received this request, I must have gone over my profile 10 times to ensure there was nothing that could any way be misconstrued as offensive or illegal. I think many people at the company already know a lot about me, but I . . . I think you would have to be more careful if you’re in the introductory months of a new job. Discussion Questions 1. Do you think Anne’s post that she was “Out too late last night” was inappropriate, given that she knew that her professional colleagues were reading her page? Explain your answer. 2. Anne and Lisa contend that Facebook allows employees to get to know each other better in “real life” and not just on the job. Both of these women are very successful business professionals, and they believe such knowledge is important. Do you? Why or why not? 3. Bob is skeptical that Facebook has potential business applications. He thinks social networking sites will become as lame and as uninteresting as business blogs and corporate holiday cards. Do you agree? Why or why not? 4. In the olden days before social networking, instant messaging, email, and “free” long-distance phone calls, social networking was restricted to the people in your department, or maybe those who worked on your floor. You knew the people to whom you revealed personal data, and they were close to you in the organizational hierarchy. You would have had almost no contact with your manager’s  manager, and what contact you did have would have been in the context of a formal meeting. How do you think management is affected when personal data is readily shared far up and down the organizational hierarchy? 5. Do you think it was appropriate for the senior manager to invite distant subordinates in the organization to be friends? Why did this action put the junior employees in a tight spot? What advantages accrue to the senior manager of having very junior friends? What advantages accrue to the junior professional of having a senior friend? 6. All of the people in this dialog update Facebook using iPhones that they purchased with their own money. Because they are not using a corporate asset, managers at Pearson would be unable to stop these employees from using Facebook, if they wanted to. How does this fact change the power structure within an organization? Consider, for example, what would happen if senior management announced an unpopular change in employee benefits or some other program. 7. As the lawyers say, “You cannot un-ring the bell.” Once you’ve revealed something about yourself, you cannot take it back. Knowing that, what criteria will you use to decide what you will post on a social networking site that is read by your professional colleagues? How do those criteria differ from the criteria you use at school?
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[ANSWERED] In many ways, nonprofit corporations are run much like other businesses. Charity

In many ways, nonprofit corporations are run much like other businesses. Charity organizations with larger operations would be expected to have a larger staff, although…

In many ways, nonprofit corporations are run much like other businesses. Charity organizations with larger operations would be expected to have a larger staff, although some have more overhead than others. Table 12.5.11 shows the number of paid staff members of charity organizations as well as the amounts of money (in millions of dollars) raised from public donations, government payments, and other sources of income. a. Find the regression equation to predict staff levels from the contributions of each type for these charities. (You will probably need to use a computer for this.) b. How many additional paid staff members would you expect to see, on average, working for a charity that receives $5 million more from public donations than another charity (all else equal)? c. To within approximately how many people can the regression equation predict the staffing levels of these charities from their revenue figures? d. Find the predicted staffing level and its residual for the American Red Cross. e. What is the result of the F test? What does it tell you? f. Does revenue from public donations have a significant impact on staffing level, holding other revenues fixed? How do you know?
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